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Posted By: Cedric On: Jun 20th, 2017 In: Uncategorized Comments: 0

JAPAN 70.3 / JAPAN TOUR 2017

With every year comes a new trip to Japan, centred around a race which I can use as a good excuse for a little holiday/DJ tour in my 2nd home. I have done 2 xterra (one in Marunuma in the Gunma prefecture some 3 hours north of Tokyo, the other one in Hokkaido, both in bear territory) and one ironman (also in Hokkaido). These races were all in fantastic locations, deep in Japanese countryside. This year however I came for the 70.3 which is based in…an airport. Centrair airport just south of Nagoya. Not exactly the same charm!

 

The airport is a destination in itself, with a floor dedicated to culinary treats, a massive public bath overlooking the runway, etc.

 

A busy hub on a man made island. We got there on Thursday morning, which din’t leave much time to acclimatise, but I am glad we didn’t arrive earlier as 4 nights in an airport is about 3 too many! Prior to the race I managed to find a 1.8k loop on the island where I could ride in circles (how exciting!), a run route along the shore and a swimming pool in Nagoya (way too hot, as always in Japan). No swimming nor riding on the course was allowed, and this being a point to point race with distincts T1 and T2, there would be no preview. Most importantly tough we also found the Banana record store and the Goza izakaya in town. Just enough to put us in good spirits.

 

With only 7 of us the pro field was small; however looking at the names I was very worried of finishing last. I’d rather come last of the pros than first of the age group any day (as long as I’m ahead), but still I’d rather NOT be last! I did come here in fairly good shape, having apparently recovered well only 3 weeks after ironman Lanzarote. For the KPR this race wouldn’t bring me much points anyway, but anything better than 7th would better my result at 70.3 Weymouth and so add a few points.

 

On morning day the water temperature was just under 20ºC, so wetsuits were allowed. A welcomed news, but surely not enough for me to catch the fast feet of my fellow pros! I did last about 200m but found myself in the red and had to let them go while I was going for a breather. Luckily the South African Johann Stofberg was swimming at a more decent pace, and I was able to hang on by his side the rest of the way, without spending much energy. We came out a minute or so behind Robbins, Nichols, Baldwin and Williams, and almost 4 minutes behind 2016 Olympian Ryan Fisher! A star in the making whom I’d watched on TV earlier in the year at the Super League triathlon series, more often than not attacking at the front of the peloton. This time he would just lead from the gun, atomising the field on the bike along the way, putting down another 4 minutes on super biker Brad Williams, and almost 8 minutes on myself. I reckon guys like Sanders or Kienle wouldn’t have done much better! For my part I started the bike as hard as I could, caught Richie Nicholls quickly and came within 30 sec of Robbins and Baldwin after 25K or so, but unfortunately they then started to ride together and I would only lose time afterwards, despite riding quite well. The course was quite unusual in a sense that it was full of dead turns and technical bits, and some little hills towards the end which would prove to be really taxing. Not a fast course by any means.

 

I arrived 5th in T2 having ridden solo all the way, and again attacked the run as strong as I could. 3’40 per km for the first 6K, which is when I started to almost simultaneously feel better, open my stride, and getting some serious tightness/pain in the glutes on my left side. Unfortunately this small niggle I’d been feeling for a few weeks had now totally flared up at the wrong moment. I would spend the last 15K in pain, running unevenly as I tried to ship most of the weight on my right side. Anything downhill or any steps were not welcomed at all. I kept my position however and crossed the line in 5th, having run in 1h21min. As soon as I crossed that line I couldn’t walk any more, that is how your body shuts down when the job is done! I ended up being rather satisfied with my fitness, but not really by how the race unfolded (if only I could have caught those 2 on the bike!), and obviously annoyed by this new injury…The next week would be spent on a road trip, sampling food and onsens in mountain ryokans, climbing to the top of the mighty Mount Fuji despite the mountain being ‘closed’, before finishing on a high with BIG back to back parties in Tokyo and Sapporo. The last one being the highlight of this trip, but that is another story (which you can read here).

 

As for the KPR…I have about 1% of chance to qualify but I haven’t given up. 10 days off and a visit to my osteo will hopefully be enough to have me resume training pain free for a 5 weeks block before Ironman Maastricht.

 

RESULTS

 

Mount Fuji closed!

 

on top of the world

 

 

 

 

 

Posted By: Cedric On: May 23rd, 2017 In: Blog News Triathlon Comments: 0

Ironman Lanzarote 2017

Having declared in my race recap post Lanza 2015 how glad I was to have finished because that meant I wouldn’t have to do it again…well here I was toeing the start line one more time 2 years later. DNF in 2013, 9th in 2015, what would 2017 bring? A hard race that is a certainty, but what else, and why the change of mind?

 

 

 

A few reasons actually. To start with, I somehow put in my mind after IM Wales in September that my goal in 2017 would be to attempt to qualify for Kona 2017, meaning I’d have to do 3 more ironman at least (the KPR is based on the best of three IMs and one 70.3). Having gone to New Zealand in March and failed to collect any points time was running out, and with June dedicated to Japan and July to parties, there was no escaping Lanzarote. At least I knew what was in store, but more importantly that this was a good course for me, a hard and honest one with 2251m of climbing which could -on a good day- allow me to hopefully come back from behind after the swim and not be stuck on my own like I was in NZ for instance.
The 12 weeks since Taupo hadn’t gone exactly smoothly in terms of training, with a mix of injuries (pubalgia, broken ribs) and parties making it difficult to have any kind of consistency. All in all I had 3 weeks of solid training and felt I was back in some kind of shape, though nowhere near running as well as I was in February. However in 2015 I finished 9th only 2 months after being hospitalised for a week because of paratyphoid, so I knew that I could only be better!

 

One of the big advantages in Lanza is that I have friends on the island, Laura and Eamon, now with Carlos and Catalina. They have a lovely house in the hills in Tinajo, and they treat me like a total prince. No shopping to do, no check in or check out, even the wine post race is furnished! All I have to do is focus on the race. I flew in on the Thursday and the wind was absolutely insane, but luckily on race race day it had calmed down a lot (especially compared to 2015) and at least it didn’t feel dangerous to ride anymore. However, having had a look at the start list, my dreams of a top 5 had all but vanished and I was now aiming for a (still ambitious) top 10…

 

This race has the peculiarity in that we all start pretty much together, the pros being on the front line but ready to be swallowed by the fast age groupers right on our backs…which is exactly what happened after about 3 strokes. No idea how they came in so fast, but one sure thing is that I wasn’t going to swim alone this time. In fact there was still a big bunch of us together after the 2nd buoy, 1k into the swim. Which should have been a good thing for me, but somehow I managed to lose focus on the way back, slowly retrograding, then my goggles filled up, my legs started cramping, and I could tell I wasn’t swimming well. By the time I got to T1 I was in 38th position, some 6.5 minutes down on the leaders! T1 was also a bit of a disaster, with cramps, loose timing chips and mounting bike too early making sure I had my work cut out!

 

 

At least this meant I wouldn’t be riding in no man’s land like in NZ, thanks to a stream of cyclists in front of me to play catch up with. My original plan of holding off for the first 120k wasn’t going to happen in these conditions! Luckily my legs felt good and I slowly but surely made my way up, passing mostly age groupers at first then the first pros started to appear, then the leading woman some 50K in to the bike (the impressive eventual winner Lucy Charles, having swam with the top guys). After La Santa I continued to push the pace, making sure I took no one with me, finally catching athletes like Malte Bruns (1st amateur in Kona 2015 and a 40h per week training monster), Trevor Delsaut, KJ Danielsson, Samuel Huerzeler and Carlos Lopez Diaz (winner of IM Mallorca in 2016). Only Timothy Van Houtem had come back from behind (no sign of Del Corral!) but I knew since the Alpe d’Huez LD that he was a much stronger cyclist than me so didn’t try to follow him.

 

When I reached the top of Mirador Del Rio I was in 10th position and thought I might be on a great day! Problem was I overcooked it a bit on some of the steeper slopes (my 23 ring at the back was clearly not enough!), I was now on my own not only for the descent but also for the last 50K of never ending 1% incline on the highway…and cramps had started to appear.

Without surprise the scenario of previous editions started repeating (albeit on a milder scale), meaning I started to be overtaken by some of the guys cited above without being able to catch their wheel whatsoever. I really hate the last hour of this bike course! And I won’t come back a 4th time to try to crack the code, I’m telling you!

 


 


 

I arrived in T2 in 15th position, more than happy to get off the bike, but nevertheless not as smashed as I thought I’d be. Having a new bike this year, Ceepo‘s Katana has made a big difference in my cycling performance in that it is the most comfortable TT bike I have ever ridden. I can stay in the TT position for hours without breaking my back, and as a result I can run better off the bike. Still running a marathon now seemed like a long way! Less wind meant a hot run, 30ºC and no shade, a real pleasure! The legs felt ok for the first 10k during which I moved up to 11th, but then I had a really rough patch between K10 and K20 and would have stopped it right there if the course hadn’t been changed to one 30k loop followed by a 12k one. No point stopping at K15 because this meant I would have had to walk 15K back to the finish line anyway. A similar ‘situation’ happened to me during my 2nd Embrunman in 2012, hitting the wall really hard barely 5k into the run, but finding nowhere to hide/sleep I carried on to the end of the first loop before finding my legs back miraculously. Here I started to feel ok again from K20 to K30, then it was waves of feeling ok/terrible/ok/terrible/ok. During this time my fellow Frenchman Guillaume Lecallier had overtaken me and caught Delsaut, then I’d caught both of them and crossed the line in 8th. You really never know what is going to happen during the marathon, and you should never give up for that very reason!

 


 

8th spot gets 305 points, which brings me exactly to the grand total of 1125 points at the current KPR. Knowing that the qualification barrier hovers around 3000 points or more, this means I would have to…win…my next ironman if I want to go to Kona. 99% unlikely, but I guess I’ll give it a try. If I feel fit anyway. Probably in Maastricht in August. If not that would have been my last ever ironman. Let’s see!

 

PS: big thanks to Silvia, my parents, my brother, Laura, Eamon and family, my osteopath Sam Burch who put me back in place only a couple weeks before the race, to my sponsors Kiwami and Ceepo, and to all who have been encouraging, messaging, texting me and those who have read this blog until here!

Posted By: Cedric On: Apr 27th, 2017 In: Uncategorized Comments: 0

The Race – Ironman New Zealand (Through the Eyes of Silvia Gin)

During the days leading to the ironman in Taupo, I was followed 24/7 by the eyes/camera of Silvia, who made this little art project video about it. Enjoy!

 

 

The Race from Silvia Gin on Vimeo.

Posted By: Cedric On: Mar 30th, 2017 In: Uncategorized Comments: 0

(Primavera) Live Show on Resident Advisor

Recently I had the ‘opportunity’ to play records in front of a camera (a few cameras in fact) as well as a real crowd in our 2nd home that is Brilliant Corners. Fellow French man and house music royalty Jeremy Underground was on air before me, streaming to literally thousands of listeners.

 

Luckily Resident Advisor is a much more eclectic and connoisseur affair than Boiler Room’s, and we were both encouraged to dig deep and play records that were not necessarily club based. More like a radio show in fact, but in public and on camera.

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Posted By: Cedric On: Mar 15th, 2017 In: Blog News Triathlon Comments: 3

IRONMAN NEW ZEALAND – A FIASCO

I missed a turn…

 

 

One thing I get asked repeatedly by a lot of people (namely my mum and my girlfriend) is to explain the motivations behind this triathlon malarkey – when will I stop ? It’s a tough one to answer really as any endurance athlete can find new goals and challenges pretty much ad vitam aeternam. I think though the main reason I am still sweating buckets going nowhere in my living room in order to compete at pro level having now just turned 40 and despite having arguably a better career to focus on (phew, breathe here!), is because I know I still haven’t reached my full potential. And I want to (reach it). As per customary with elite sport, I went through as many highs as lows over the years, but somehow I tend to dwell on those missed opportunities a lot more than on the successes. As a runner I always seemed to get injured while at the peak of my form, and hence never got the times/results I knew I could have had. When I tore my Achilles in the final of the U23 french national championship, 300m for the finish line, that was one injury too many and I stopped my running career right there. I was in the shape of my life that day and fighting for glory and a definite PB when injury stroke again. This was a pivotal time in my life as I then took a 180º turn away from competitive sport, but the feeling of unfinished business never left me.

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Posted By: Cedric On: Jan 15th, 2017 In: Blog Music Comments: 4

2016 – A Year In Music

2016 will forever be remembered as a year to…forget ! Much has been said about the passing of David Mancuso and as far as I’m concerned it felt like losing a family member. I had come to the point where I thought David was immortal (as some people should be, really) and that he would always be around to guide us…well I guess he will, though not physically any more. With David’s passing, I for one have learned about my own mortality all too suddenly, and this came as a shock. I wasn’t prepared – no one was. However, if anything this has reinforced even further our essential need of dancing with friends, as often as can possibly be. Love is the message and music is our way of life, let’s never forget.

 

As if that wasn’t enough we lost other luminaries like Prince (whose music I will forever be playing and carrying around with me – starting with CREAM at the gong of midnight this past NYE), David Bowie, George Michael, Leonard Cohen, Sharon Jones, and too many more…and that gave us a really shitty year…which became officially one the worst year of my generation as we witnessed the Brexit, Trump and the rise of populism and xenophobia across the world. These times we are living they ain’t easy. Sometimes I wish I could just be transported to that first Loft party on Valentine’s day 1970 on Broadway, NYC, and just stay on that magic carpet ride to eternity…

 

However we still have a life to live, and we might as well bounce off and fight back…and party more ! In terms of musical output at least, 2016 was a vintage as good as any, be it for new music or quality reissues of timeless music. A lot less edits these days it seems, as people prefer to put out straight reissues, which can only be a good thing. As always I will try to compile my own personal favourites of these last 12 months. There are still many reasons to stay positive and look forward to better days. I’ll start with the best of the best releases, the ones that really were unmissable this year, before listing most of my personal highlights.

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Posted By: Cedric On: Nov 27th, 2016 In: Blog Music Comments: 2

David Mancuso – Music Is My Way Of Life

For my inner circle of music friends, there isn’t a lot that hasn’t been said about David already, especially since his passing on Monday the 14th of November, but for my ‘triathlon friends’ I thought this little tribute would be much welcome as I believe most wouldn’t even have heard of him.

 

I won’t do a full biography/music history here, as others are much more qualified and have even done so eloquently already, starting with this exceptional interview of David done by my friend Tim Lawrence, author of the dance music bible Loves Saves the Day (whose title itself comes from an invitation at David’s Loft party in 1970). Rather I will keep these reflections quite personal and link all the relevant tributes along the way.


love-saves-the-day-by-tim-lawrence + more

Posted By: Cedric On: Sep 23rd, 2016 In: Uncategorized Comments: 0

70.3 WEYMOUTH / IRONMAN WALES

Barely a month after the Norseman it was time, believe it or not, for some back to back racing. And not just any races. A tough 70.3 followed by an even tougher ironman (rated amongst the 11th hardest in the world by 220 magazine).

I took 9 full days off after Norway, which were necessary both physically and mentally, before putting in a block of 3 weeks of good training. Weymouth and Tenby had always been on the back of my mind and I had planned my DJ diary accordingly. 4 busy party week-ends in a row followed by 2 week-ends of racing where I hoped to be recovered and competitive. Not an easy feat with the constant lack of sleep and feeling of being on recovery mode from the week-end until Wednesday every week. However, as hard as the Norseman was, its run section was either flat or uphill, meaning no descent, much less impact and a somewhat easier muscular recovery as a result, with almost none of the dreaded blown quads and D.O.M.S.

 

In ironman triathlon world, early September means the start of the new season for WTS, and that the hunt for KPR points towards the next year’s world champs begins once more. All the top athletes who have qualified for Kona in October won’t be racing at this time of the year (except Harry Wiltshire that is) and so the races are more open. My idea behind these 2 races was that the results would give me a good indication of whether I should pursue the Kona dream in 2017 as a pro athlete, or step down as an age grouper come January 2017 and go there as such.

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Posted By: cedric On: Aug 23rd, 2016 In: Blog Photos Triathlon Comments: 0

Norseman 2016

Un résumé de la course en français se trouve ici sur le site de Trimes:

 

My whole 2016 season has been shaped around this AA race. The preparation started at the beginning of November, when the list of selected athletes was announced. I must have read the race manual at least a dozen times to make sure I was ready come race day with every technical, physical and logistic aspects of this mythical race. That leaves plenty of time (9 months) to have recurring dreams about one of the most renowned and most coveted finish lines in the world of triathlon. The summit of the G.A.U.S.T.A.T.O.P.P.E.N.

 

Norseman means support team. You don’t race on your own like in a regular triathlon. Nobody will get DQed for outside assistance here. In fact this is compulsory, as the only 2 aid stations are at K25 and K32.5 of the run, some 8 hours + into the race. The team that follows us throughout the day is there to feed us, dress/undress us, calm our nerves, shout at us, encourage us, etc. This is one of the key aspects that makes this race so special. Then of course you have the course (unique and magical nordic landscape, cold fjords, 5 ‘cols’ on the bike for a total elevation of 3360m, and last but not least possibly the hardest run of any iron event with the 12K of Zombie Hill averaging 10% followed by 5K of fell ‘running’ (scrambling really) to reach the finish line, at an altitude of 1883m). Add to this a rather hostile and unpredictable weather, and that gives you a never ending yet unforgettable day out ! + more

Posted By: Cedric On: Jul 13th, 2016 In: Uncategorized Comments: 0

PRESS NEWS: KIWAMI – TRIMES – STRAVA

On a personal level, Ironman France 2016 will go down a landmark, what with press articles, sudden increase in strava followers, and most importantly a new sponsor with KIWAMI !

 

Barely a few minutes after crossing the finish line I was on the mic with Mathieu Amielh, whom I knew previously from Triathlete magazine. He has now published a fantastic photo report of IM Nice fror Strava, in which I have a small role 😉

 

The morning after the race I had completed an interview with the triathlon website bible Trimes, which you can  read here (in French).

 

Finally the good result (2nd French after all) coupled with my good looks (!) landed me a new sponsorship deal with my favorite triathlon brand, Kiwami. Believe me I am not lying, since I’ve been racing (unsponsored !) in Kiwami gear since I first ‘discovered’ the brand @ Embrunman in 2010 !

 

Very much looking forward to parade my Kiwami ass around as much as I can for the next 2 seasons !

 

Ced for Kiwami

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