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Posted By: Cedric On: Nov 21st, 2018 In: News Triathlon Uncategorized X-terra Comments: 0

XTERRA WORLD CHAMPS MAUI 2018

In 2009 I was a youthful and wide-eyed triathlete, landing in Maui for my first experience of the island (and my 2nd xterra ever). I’d flown in with my steel framed Kona Caldera mountain bike and aluminium wheels (must have weighted about 12 kg at least), and within a couple of days was sent out to climb the mighty Haleakala volcano alongside Julie Dibens, Paul Davis, Llewelyn Holmes and a couple of others. Of course the rear wheel exploded halfway up the climb, and -the rear brake being nonoperational- I crashed heavily on the treacherous lava rocks on the way down, rendering swimming in the Pacific for the following couple of weeks with open wounds into an absolute nightmare. Schooling days!

 

To my surprise however, I managed to blag a 30-34 World title, placing 2nd amateur and 22nd overall. Needless to say, I was hooked.

 

9 years down the line, now a newly-retired-yet-still-part-time triathlete, I still don’t have enough of the island, and so went back to Maui for the 5th time (!). Truth be told, the big aim was the long trip in Kauai afterwards, more precisely the end of the Kalalau trail where Silvia and I lost ourselves to the bowels of Mother Nature back in 2014..

 

Nevertheless I was hoping for a decent showing on race day. Having ‘qualified’ in Romania in August, that gave me two months to try to recover some decent fitness. In fact I’d started to feel like a cyclist again only just a couple of weeks before departure – prior to that, I could still pretend to be a decent swimmer/runner, but my cycling legs never got back anywhere near their vintage years like xterra Pacific islands 2012 – or even IM Barcelona 2017 for that matter. Perfect timing I thought.
Having done this race twice (DNF in 2011, 18th in 2014), I knew what to expect: tons of climbing, some twisty bits during the first and final miles of the bike, but nothing too technical. At least not when it’s dry. However, as for any mtb course, weather conditions will often have a massive influence on its technicality/ridability.
When we got there on the Wednesday, I only had time for a run and the course was already very slippery, though manageable. Doing the whole loop on the Thursday, I was able to ride about 95% of it, having to push the bike on only 2-3 occasions. But already it was a really thin line between making it and having to unclip and push bike. Any more rain and many of those ‘just abouts’ would become ‘no nos’.

 

In the meantime, Friday was an off day so we did the road to Hana, the whole loop, anti clockwise. Long and windy but oh so majestic road trip!

 

 

I didn’t bring any mud tyres with me. The local bike shops had sold all their stock. In any case those same bike shops (sharks) were charging $95 per hour for labour. So fuck that. It did rain every day though, especially at night. On the Saturday, the day before the race, the lower part of the course was absolutely unridable. Imagine having to climb 25% steeped banked hairpins covered in slippery yet sticky mud. And now try to descend that. Total joke. One of the bike mechanics in Paia told me to spray the tyres and the underneath of my bike with some PAM butter to repel the mud, and to carry a knife with me to cut through the mud if it still managed to accumulate nonetheless and prevent the wheels from turning. So that was my plan B.

 

D – 1

 

Secret Weapon?

 

On race day it wasn’t actually raining. Lono, the Hawaiian rain deity had decided to give us a day of respite I guess; however the damage was done! The surf was up and higher than I’d ever seen before on that part of the coast, and the organisers had decided to implement the “plan B” they mentioned in the race briefing: ditch the unridable first 2 miles of uphill switchbacks in the bushes in favour of hard ground golf cart tracks.

 

I’d slept quite well (not a good sign) and wasn’t too stressed considering the scale of the task awaiting us on the slopes of the West Maui mountains. I was eager to get going and excited to try out the Kiwami Aquarush sleeved swinskin for the first time in a race (swimskins are banned in Europe). Things triathletes get excited about…During the warm-up swim, I mistimed a (big) wave on my way back to the shore, found myself tumbling 3-4 times and for a moment unaware of where the surface vs the ground were. When I finally found some air and my bearings, I felt somewhat disorientated and realised I had lost my timing ship in the mayhem. 10 min before the start, this wasn’t the ideal situation…Luckily I saw Trey Garman on the shore, and within 5 min Janet Clark (Xterra director) was calling out my name on the beach with a new chip in hand. Quite efficient on that one guys! I was back smiling.

 

The ensuing swim didn’t feel too difficult in comparison. I mostly led the 2nd big pack around, used the waves a lot more to my advantage (except going back IN for the 2nd lap, which felt like one step forward 2 step backward for a little while. Also diving under a wave and having to stay underwater for 10-15 seconds while already out of breath was borderline scary!). When I reached the shore for the 2nd time and was on my way up to T2, I found myself next to Josiah Middaugh and Melanie McQuaid (both ex Xterra World Champs), exactly like I did back in 2009 for my first time here. Shows that when it comes to swimming, once you reach a certain level, you don’t really improve much, but you don’t lose much either! I’m guessing I could still swim at that pace in 10 years time (what with a few months training obviously).

 

All smiles with Konstantinos Koumargialis, 30 min from the start.

 

 

SWIM START – with my mate Rife Hilgartner

 

 

XTERRA MAUI 2018 – SWIM START

 

XTERRA 2018 SWIM START

 

XTERRA MAUI 2018 – SWIM

 

XTERRA MAUI 2018 SWIM EXIT

 

XTERRA 2018 SWIM EXIT First Lap

 

XTERRA MAUI 2018 – SWIM EXIT – ONTO T1

 

Onto T1 then. My Achilles’ been sore for months, even more so right after coming out of the water, so I just cruised to T1, the legs feeling rather good otherwise. I lost my usual 30 seconds on pretty much everyone, and when I jumped on my bike I could see both Lesley Peterson and Brigitta Poor now in front of me. Luckily, as I mentioned earlier the first 2 miles were all uphill and on tarmac, my terrain of predilection!

 

 

Great pic by Silvia Gin. INTO THE LIGHT!

 

By the time we reached the lake, I had overtaken a good dozen riders and was in 20th position overall. Unfortunately this is where we hit the trails and what was bound to happen did happen, though even earlier than I expected: on pretty much the first couple of bends I was already skidding all over the place, unable to get a grip on this Maui mud. I understood right there, 10 min into the bike, that this race was already over for me (for those interested, I had a Nobby Nic as a front tyre, and a Racing Ralph at the rear. These are not mud tyres by any means. Mind you, even with mud tyres, you’d still have to get off the bike a lot on this course in these conditions, even for the most skilled riders. But without, you can’t even try.)

 

There was a crazy scene on the long uphill stretch that leads to the trademark ridge which marks the summit of this course. A file of riders were following each others, pushing bikes, sliding back, trying to step back on the saddle but inevitably failing to pedal more than a couple meters and falling over again. In some places the gradients were so steep and the mud so slippery that even pushing bike was a nightmare and you could see riders and bikes sliding backwards with a bunch of expletives as the soundtrack. One step forward, 2 steps…once again. Even the cameramen on their powerful motorbikes got stuck on some of these portions. Comical scenes for any outsider watching for sure (I hope everyone following the race on TV had a laugh), but in the heat of it, believe me, it was no fun at all. All the bits that were “just about” ridable 3 days previously were absolutely not today, and there are lots!
Only on the more exposed part of the course was it possible to ride a bit and feel part of a bike race, but as soon as we hit the (mostly man made) twisty loops of the last 5 miles of the lower slopes, it became a joke again. By that time, the wheels were not turning, gears not shifting, cables not moving, brakes not braking…a pleasure.
Somehow though, Silvia managed to hide in the bushes and catch me smiling and ON the bike!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sometimes I would stop minutes at a time trying to remove manually the deadly mix of mud and cane leaves that forced the bike to a standstill. I must have crashed at least 10 times, including once on camera (see the video at the end of this article), and once into a tree.
Exiting this mess and reaching T2 felt like a deliverance. I had no idea of my position any more (I knew I was far), but was all too glad to finally be able to drop this bike!

 

Once on 2 feet it felt more like a race, even though there were times were the only way to move forward was to pull yourself from trees and branches and whatever you could grab. The best off road shoes were slipping like on ice, but I’m sure a good old pair of cross country spikes (15mm) would have been a massive advantage on this course – I believe only Bradley Weiss (2nd place finisher and fastest runner on the day by 2 minutes) had the idea/luck to wear some. I must have overtaken a dozen guys or so on that run, without especially trying hard as I wasn’t really in it mentally, but still I felt like I finished on a good note, with even a sprint finish to boot (!).

 

Glad it’s over?

 

 

Bikes in T2

 

 

 

RACE HIGHLIGHTS (check out my skills at 3:15!):

 

 

RESULTS

 

That would be 39th then. By far the furthest I’ve ever finished, not only in Maui, but in any triathlon! Not that it mattered too much, the most important was to finish, in one piece. What really mattered was…the Kauai holiday afterwards. And that didn’t happen! We flew there the morning after the race. Perfect sunny day in Maui, the best we’d had so far. Less than one hour flight to neighbouring Kauai and it’s pouring down and overcast like crazy. As we collected our hire car, we learned that the road to Haena (not Hana), where the trailhead to the Kalalau trail (the very reason why we came here in the first place) had been closed since April due to heavy flooding, and only opened for residents…Furthermore the weather forecast was heavy rain and flash floods for the next week. Not ideal when our plan was to camp here the whole time…It took us only a couple of hours to decide to switch plans and head off to dry and sunny California instead…Kauai we’ll have to come back!

 

Badwater Basin, Death Valley…as far from the rain as can be!

 

Zabriskie Point!

 

San Francisco!

 

Golden Gate

 

California Style

 

Big Sur

 

Dream Car, Santa Cruz

 

Big Sur

 

Big Trees! (Sequoia National Park)

 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A Car Road/Whoops/A Road Trip in California and Maui with @cedwoo and John. Soundtrack by Percy Mayfield

A post shared by Silvia Gin (@ginsilvia) on

Posted By: Cedric On: Jan 19th, 2018 In: Uncategorized Comments: 0

2017 – A Year In Music

On a personal level, 2017 will remain as the year I stopped being an elite triathlon racer (my last ever race was completed in September in Barcelona). As a result I found myself with 15 to 20 hours of ‘spare’ time every week, which I can now dedicate to M.U.S.I.C. Expect to see me DJing a lot more in clubs/venues outside of the trusted BEAUTY & THE BEAT and BRILLIANT CORNERS events. Expect more from the label too, which has seen 2 releases this year but will surely take up more of my time in the coming months. Expect also a return of me fiddling around with music softwares, who knows. + more

Posted By: Cedric On: Dec 17th, 2017 In: Uncategorized Comments: 0

La Condition Masculine vs La Condition Feminine

I recently sat down with the lovely chaps at Infinite Ear for an in depth discussion, a la casa, about a mix I had just recorded, which was centered around the theme of female empowerment.

 

This was made in reaction to the numerous examples popping up in the news regarding cases of machismo, sexism, men using their power to harass/violate/exploit women, etc. Nothing new, something that’s been going on for ever, but hopefully a topic that is creating a growing awareness thanks to this sudden increase in exposure. + more

Posted By: Cedric On: Oct 9th, 2017 In: Uncategorized Comments: 0

Urban Essence 39 – Beauty & the Beat Review + Exclusive Mix

The chaps over at the Urban Essence HQ have stumbled upon the Brilliant Corners tent at Houghton festival this last August, and have declared it the highlight of their week-end (not bad considering the sick line-up and 24 hour music licence over 4 days!).

 

Since then they have come to their first Beauty & the Beat party, and they have written this really cool piece about it, which I’ve copied and pasted below. + more

Posted By: Cedric On: Sep 25th, 2017 In: Blog News Triathlon Uncategorized Comments: 1

70.3 Weymouth – Part II

Being on the start line of the Weymouth 70.3 race, 3 months and a bit after my last race and only a month after announcing my imminent retirement, was already a victory in itself. Not that I expected much, having had only a few pain free runs and a training regime somewhat chaotic what with a summer filled with festivals and gigs (and ensuing sleep deprived week-ends) every single week. In fact I hadn’t had a week-end off partying since Japan in early June! But, having teamed up at the last minute with my mate and 70.3 novice Evgeny, here I was back on the Jurassic coast nonetheless, planning to use this race as a good training day that would hit the reset button on and turn me into a triathlete again, albeit for a short amount of time. Because yes, Ironman Barcelona is only 2 weeks away, and as previously explained this will be my last race as a professional athlete. + more

Posted By: Cedric On: Aug 17th, 2017 In: Uncategorized Comments: 3

End Of A Chapter…

As I am writing this I would rather have been in Kalmar, Sweden, getting ready to compete in the last Ironman of the 2017 season, aiming for a top 2 spot which should have been sufficient to qualify for Kona. Kona, the mecca, the holy grail for long distance triathletes which has been my one and only focus in training this year. Admittedly it was an ambitious goal, but with a lot of luck and a decent form it could have been possible. But I have finally admitted that the dream is over and that I won’t see Kona. Not as an athlete anyway. + more

Posted By: Cedric On: Jun 20th, 2017 In: Uncategorized Comments: 0

JAPAN 70.3 / JAPAN TOUR 2017

With every year comes a new trip to Japan, centred around a race which I can use as a good excuse for a little holiday/DJ tour in my 2nd home. I have done 2 xterra (one in Marunuma in the Gunma prefecture some 3 hours north of Tokyo, the other one in Hokkaido, both in bear territory) and one ironman (also in Hokkaido). These races were all in fantastic locations, deep in Japanese countryside. This year however I came for the 70.3 which is based in…an airport. Centrair airport just south of Nagoya. Not exactly the same charm! + more

Posted By: Cedric On: Apr 27th, 2017 In: Uncategorized Comments: 0

The Race – Ironman New Zealand (Through the Eyes of Silvia Gin)

During the days leading to the ironman in Taupo, I was followed 24/7 by the eyes/camera of Silvia, who made this little art project video about it. Enjoy!

 

 

The Race from Silvia Gin on Vimeo.

Posted By: Cedric On: Mar 30th, 2017 In: Uncategorized Comments: 1

(Primavera) Live Show on Resident Advisor

Recently I had the ‘opportunity’ to play records in front of a camera (a few cameras in fact) as well as a real crowd in our 2nd home that is Brilliant Corners. Fellow French man and house music royalty Jeremy Underground was on air before me, streaming to literally thousands of listeners.

 

Resident Advisor is -admittedly- a much more eclectic and connoisseur affair than Boiler Room’s, and we were both encouraged to dig deep and play records that were not necessarily club based. More like a radio show in fact, but in public and on camera.

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Posted By: Cedric On: Sep 23rd, 2016 In: Uncategorized Comments: 1

70.3 WEYMOUTH / IRONMAN WALES

Barely a month after the Norseman it was time, believe it or not, for some back to back racing. And not just any races. A tough 70.3 followed by an even tougher ironman (rated amongst the 11th hardest in the world by 220 magazine).

I took 9 full days off after Norway, which were necessary both physically and mentally, before putting in a block of 3 weeks of good training. Weymouth and Tenby had always been on the back of my mind and I had planned my DJ diary accordingly. 4 busy party week-ends in a row followed by 2 week-ends of racing where I hoped to be recovered and competitive. Not an easy feat with the constant lack of sleep and feeling of being on recovery mode from the week-end until Wednesday every week. However, as hard as the Norseman was, its run section was either flat or uphill, meaning no descent, much less impact and a somewhat easier muscular recovery as a result, with almost none of the dreaded blown quads and D.O.M.S.

 

In ironman triathlon world, early September means the start of the new season for WTS, and that the hunt for KPR points towards the next year’s world champs begins once more. All the top athletes who have qualified for Kona in October won’t be racing at this time of the year (except Harry Wiltshire that is) and so the races are more open. My idea behind these 2 races was that the results would give me a good indication of whether I should pursue the Kona dream in 2017 as a pro athlete, or step down as an age grouper come January 2017 and go there as such.

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